Tips From A Recruiter: How To Manage Job Interview Anxiety

7 Tips For Acing Your Video Interview

Tips From A Recruiter: How To Manage Job Interview Anxiety

By Ebony Seymour, MBA | August 30, 2020

Let us start by saying, “We understand.”

Interviewing is an act that naturally gives one anxiety. It’s the fear of not knowing what to expect – what questions will be asked, if you’ll be prepared enough, if the interviewer will be engaging, or what to do if you suddenly forget all your talking points!

One thing that distinguishes the recruitment team at GQR from other agencies, is that we are committed to ensuring the candidates we work with are fully prepared – so the potential for interview anxiety is minimal. Preparation is something we pride ourselves on when it comes to advising our candidates before they commit to interviewing. These prep sessions often provide a platform for fine-tuning one’s interview skills as well as development opportunities for others.

Based on these interview preparation session, we have collated five strategic tips for candidates heading into an interview:

Be Concise

Demonstrate your understanding of the role and responsibilities clearly and concisely. The interviewer should walk away knowing how your experience “makes sense” for the role they are looking to hire for.

Use the STAR Method: Situation, Task , Action & Result

Often, a question starts with “Tell me about a time when…” Or, something along those lines. This signifies a behavioral question. The interviewer wants to get a sense of how you explain the SITUATION and TASK requested but also how you took ACTION and what the end RESULT was. Results being the critical component here – make sure you are able to speak well to this piece.

Know Your Audience

Hiring managers are taking time out of their schedules to get to know who you are. Before an interview, they have often reviewed your resume and perhaps researched your previous company. When they work with a specialized agency recruiter, hiring managers also receive a breakdown of you as a candidate plus rationale as the WHY you are a good fit for the role. It would serve you well to make sure you know as much about the company and hiring manager (and/or interviewer) as they know about you. Our recommendations? Review the interviewer(s)’ LinkedIn profile and website bio if they have it. Also, look at the company’s website and any awards or news articles that exist about the company or department you’re interviewing for. As your career advisor, we give you insight into the interviewer and their background, experience, etc. Take it from us – there is nothing worse than starting an interview and realizing that the candidate knows absolutely nothing about you or your company. Preparation is key!

Practice In The Mirror

Body language is critical – particularly when it comes to in-person and video interviews. From your facial expressions, sitting up straight and not fidgeting, an interviewer can often receive just as much information from your verbal communication as your nonverbal.

I once prepped a candidate over video by asking him a series of questions that an interviewer may ask. As he answered the questions, I noticed he was shaking his head from side to side – as you would do to signal a ‘no’ response. I pointed this out to him and he had no idea he was doing it. I provided the feedback that as an interviewer, if I’m asking a candidate a question and they’re answering but shaking their head ‘no’ at the same time, I’m led to believe that they may not be confident or telling the truth. I suggested that he practice answering a few questions in the mirror to become more aware of his body language. It made a world of difference!

Prepare & Ask Great Questions

An interview goes both ways. As much as you are being interviewed as a candidate for a company, you should interview a company as a potential employee. Asking the right questions can gauge if a company is a right fit for you. Understand the company’s values and culture, as well as their growth goals and trajectory. My favorite question to hear a candidate ask is, “Can you tell me about your culture?” This helps an interviewer understand that culture is important to you. But beware! If they aren’t able to articulate their company culture well, that could be a red flag. Really consider what it is that you’re looking for in your next opportunity and be sure to craft specific questions that help you make a decision on the company.

Bonus Tip: Ask For The Job

Not directly of course. When I interviewed with GQR, and it was my turn to ask questions, I posed this one to the hiring managers, “What reservations do you have about hiring me? I want to make sure I leave this room knowing that you have all the information you need to make an informed decision about hiring me.” This was a recommendation I received from a friend based on his own interview experiences and having wished he had more clarity on roles he interviewed for but did not get. Funny thing, when I asked this question there was suddenly a complete shift in the room – I knew this probing question made me stand out from other candidates and solidified me as being serious about the opportunity. It also gave me the clarity I needed and the opportunity to address any hesitations head-on.

 

READ ALSO: 7 Tips For Acing Your Video Interview 

 

 

About the Author
Ebony Seymour, MBA

Ebony is our Renewable Energy and Power lead for the Investment and Advisory team, operating out of the Los Angeles office.

She focuses in the New York, San Francisco and Chicago markets to identify top tier talent for her clientele, looking to build or grow an investment team with a renewable energy focus. With a widespread network, she provides her clients with a diverse talent pool of experienced professionals.

Her network of clients includes Investment Banks and funds within the Private Equity and Venture Capture space.  Her team focuses on the Associate level and above, with a high concentration on Executive level searches.

Ebony’s passion for professional development, diversity and inclusion, and the renewable energy space have been coupled together in her role with GQR. She is excited to continue to help her clients build amazing, top-performing teams in the industry. Ebony is a proud member of the WRISE Los Angeles Chapter as the Director of Professional Development.

Ebony graduated from Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition. She later obtained an MBA in Business Management and Marketing from Franklin University.

Fun Fact: Ebony drove from Ohio to Los Angeles in two days, on a journey to join the GQR team. Along the way, she enjoyed views of the Grand Canyon, St. Louis Gateway Arch and a Mountain Lion in Utah.

Read More About the Author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Gain access to the resources and steps we are taking to become more effective allies to the Black community – to help inform your own journey.

Stay Informed & Register Your Interest